Researchers

Our Researchers

Our researchers are from the University of Tasmania (UTAS), the Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre (ACE CRC), The Australian National University (ANU), Murdoch University, Griffith University and Charles Sturt University (CSU).

Our social and biophysical researchers, science leaders and contributors are drawn from a consortium of schools and centres within these organisations including: UTAS Centre for Environment, UTAS School of Geography and Environmental Studies, UTAS School of Economics and Finance, Murdoch University School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, ANU Fenner School of Environment & Society, ACE CRC Climate Futures, UTAS School of Zoology, UTAS School of Plant Science - Environmental Change Biology Group, Griffith University Griffith Climate Change Response Program and CSU Institute for Land and Water Society.

Researchers

Adam Cowell is our dedicated liaison person in the Canberra based National Environmental Research Program (NERP) team in the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Adam works closely with the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team.

Alex is investigating the principles of the National Wildlife Corridors Plan in two study areas, the Lower Hunter and the Tasmanian Midlands. Alex is located in Brisbane at the University of Queensland and works closely with the Regional Sustainability Planning team in the Department of the Environment in Canberra. 

Charles Sturt University and Albury based, Allan leads the Hunter Valley focused study on integrating community values into regional sustainability planning.

Angus joined the Economic Futures Team as an honours student in 2013. The team is developing a conceptual landscape bio-economic model and associated experimental economics platform to evaluate policy options. In 2012, Angus ran the experimental economics laboratory for the team's research.

Anne Hardy from the School of Business at the University of Tasmania is leading the Sustainable Tourism study of community attitudes to nature-based tourism with a focus on Tasmania’s world heritage and other protected areas.

Brendan leads the Bioregional Futures team that is applying a range of tools and techniques to study characteristics of landscape ecosystems and the patterns of diversity under scenarios of natural and human induced change.

The Bioregional Futures Team includes field ecologist Dr Sue Gould (Griffith University), and The Australian National University based GIS and Spatial Analysis specialists, Luciana Porfirio and Sonia Hugh. Dr Alex Lechner (Wildlife Corridors Research Fellow) liaises closely with both the Wildlife Team and the Bioregional Futures Team.

Based at the University of Melbourne, Brett is a collaborator in the Vegetation and Fire Project team focusing on the Australian Alps. Brett’s research provides a critically-needed framework for managing fire for biodiversity conservation in fire-prone landscapes globally.

Chris leads the Wildlife Project that is developing distribution models for selected mammal, bird and reptile species. They are examining patterns of concordance of habitat and climatic refugia for Tasmania, and modelling species distributions for priority invasive animals in the Australian Alps.

The Wildlife Team includes Dr Nick Beeton (Wildlife Population Modeller) and Gareth Davies (PhD student). Dr Alex Lechner (Wildlife Corridors Research Fellow) liaises closely with both the Wildlife Team and the Bioregional Futures Team.

Under the umbrella of Charles Sturt University, Christopher is the primary researcher in the Hunter Valley study of community values towards conservation and biodiversity.

David leads the Vegetation and Fire Project team that is examining how fire activity varies according to landscape, vegetation type, land tenure and management history, including grazing and burning, in two South East Australia settings (Tasmania and the Australian Alps).

The University of Tasmania based Vegetation and Fire Team includes Dr Grant Williamson (Eco-Spatial Analyst) and Louise Romanin (PhD Student), and Dr Brett Murphy (Research Fellow) from the Melbourne University.

In 2012, Gareth started his PhD in the Wildlife Project team looking the role of marsupials as ecosystem engineers. His studies will contribute to examining patterns of concordance of habitat and climatic refugia in Tasmania.

As the Knowledge Broker for the Australian Alps Study Area, Gill is part of the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team that underpins the research integration and delivery to stakeholders.

Grant is the Eco-Spatial Analyst in the Vegetation and Fire Project team that is examining how fire activity varies according to landscape, vegetation type, land tenure and management history, including grazing and burning, in two South East Australia settings (Tasmania and the Australian Alps).

Greg is the Climate Modeller in the Climate Futures team that is generating new fine-scale resolution climate projections for the Australian Alps.

John leads the Economic Futures team that is developing a conceptual landscape bio-economic model and associated experimental economics platform to evaluate policy options. They are focusing on market-based instruments (MBIs) and designing economic instruments to promote landscape level biodiversity management.

The University of Tasmania based Economic Futures Team includes Dr Sayed Iftekhar (Environmental Economist) and Angus Scheibner (honours student).

As the Knowledge Broker for the Tasmanian Midlands Study Area, Louise is part of the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team that underpins the research integration and delivery to stakeholders.

In 2012, Louise started her PhD in the Vegetation and Fire Project focusing on fire history in the Tasmanian Midlands. Her research will contribute to examining how fire activity varies according to landscape, vegetation type, land tenure and management history in the Tasmanian Midlands.

Luciana is based at the Australian National University and is part of the Bioregional Futures team that is applying a range of tools and techniques to study characteristics of landscape ecosystems and the patterns of diversity under scenarios of natural and human induced change.

Michael is contributing to the social research element of the hub through the Social and Institutional Futures team. Michael is researching institutional, social and economic conditions relevant to biodiversity conservation to provide an improved understanding of the social and ecological drivers of biodiversity at regional scale.

Michael co-leads the Social and Institutional Futures Project that is contributing the social research to the hub's analysis. The Social and Institutional Futures team is researching institutional, social and economic conditions relevant to biodiversity conservation to provide an improved understanding of the social and ecological drivers of biodiversity at regional scale.

The Social and Institutional Futures Team includes Co-Leader  Associate Professor Sue Moore  (Murdoch University) and social researchers Dr Michael Mitchell (University of Tasmania), Professor Allan Curtis (Charles Sturt University) and Dr Christopher Raymond (Charles Sturt University), and PhD student Sarah Clement (Murdoch University). Sam Gadsby completed her masters with the team in 2012. Janice Miller joined the team in 2013 as a master student.

Nathan leads the Climate Futures Project that produced fine-scale regional climate projections for Tasmania to 2100 as part of Climate Futures for Tasmania. The Climate Futures team is generating new fine-scale resolution climate projections for the Australian Alps.

The Climate Futures Team includes Dr Bec Harris (Climate Research Fellow), Dr Greg Lee (Climate Modeller) and Paul Fox-Hughes (Bushfire Weather Analyst).

Nick has been investigating the modelling program STAR and has formatted a hub friendly version for use in our research into management of invasive animals and wildlife disease. This is likely to be very valuable in the investigation of horses and deer in the Australian Alps.

Read Nick's blogspot that contains Tidbits about programming in 'R'. Nick started the blog on the suggestion of one of the PhD students in our lab. Her complaint was that, despite the existence of useful resources like R-help and similar places online, she regularly came across relatively simple problems in R which had no easily accessible solutions or examples on the internet. 

 

http://r-tidbits.blogspot.com.au/

Oberon works for the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and the Environment, in the Sustainable Landscapes Branch. Oberon's in-kind contribution to the hub is recognised in the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team, which underpins the research integration and delivery to stakeholders.

 

In 2012, Trish started her Masters studies with the UTAS School of Geography and her research is contributing to the Freshwater Ecosystems Project. Focusing on the Tasmanian Midlands, Trish’s research is validating a model that describes river health.

Paul is part of the Climate Futures Project that is generating new fine-scale resolution climate projections for the Australian Alps. With a background in bushfire meteorology, Paul is researching likely changes to bushfire risk under a changing climate.

Based at the University of Tasmania, Peter leads the Freshwater Ecosystems Project that is developing a suite of models to help managers and planners explore how freshwater ecosystems are likely to respond to management interventions and climate change.

The Freshwater Ecosystems Team includes Dr Regina Magierowski (Stream Ecologist) and Trish Clements (Masters Student).

Bec is part of the Climate Futures Project that is generating new fine-scale resolution climate projections for the Australian Alps. With an extensive background in field ecology, she works closely with researchers across the hub to extract, analyse and interpret the climate projections for particular species under threat from climate change.

Based at the University of Tasmania, Regina is part of the Freshwater Ecosystems Project that is developing a suite of models to help managers and planners explore how freshwater ecosystems are likely to respond to management interventions and climate change.

The Freshwater Ecosystems Team includes Professor Peter Davies (Project Leader) and Trish Clements (Masters Student).

 

Located in Canberra at the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Ross is our departmental knowledge broker. He is our main liaison person with the Regional Sustainability Planning team to ensure our research meets the needs of policy and decision makers.

In 2012, Sam's Masters project focused on improving biodiversity outcomes on private land in the Northern Midlands of Tasmania. Sam contributed to the social research element of the hub through the Social and Institutional Futures Project by identifying drivers of biodiversity conservation in the Tasmanian Midlands.

Murdoch University and Perth based PhD student, Sarah is contributing to the social research element of the hub through the Social and Institutional Futures Project. Sarah is focusing her studies on analysing the institutional and policy arrangements supporting biodiversity conservation in Australia.

Sayed is a major contributor to the Economic Futures team that is developing a conceptual landscape bio-economic model and associated experimental economics platform to evaluate policy options. He is focusing on market-based instruments (MBIs) and designing economic instruments to promote landscape level biodiversity management.

Based at the Australian National University, Sonia is part of the Bioregional Futures team that is applying a range of tools and techniques to study characteristics of landscape ecosystems and the patterns of diversity under scenarios of natural and human induced change.

Through the Griffith University, Sue is part of the Bioregional Futures team that is applying a range of tools and techniques to study characteristics of landscape ecosystems and the patterns of diversity under scenarios of natural and human induced change.

Sue is co-leader fo the Social and Institutional Futures Project that is contributing the social research to the hub's analysis. The Social and Institutional Futures team is researching institutional, social and economic conditions relevant to biodiversity conservation to provide an improved understanding of the social and ecological drivers of biodiversity at regional scale.

The Social and Institutional Futures Team includes Co-Leader Dr Michael Lockwood (University of Tasmania) and  social researchers Dr Michael Mitchell (University of Tasmania), Professor Allan Curtis (Charles Sturt University) and Dr Christopher Raymond (Charles Sturt University), and PhD student Sarah Clement (Murdoch University). Sam Gadsby completed her masters with the team in 2012. Janice Miller joined the team in 2013 as a master student.

As the Communications Manager for the hub, Suzie is part of the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team that underpins the research integration and delivery to stakeholders.

Suzie presented at the 2012 Conference of the Climate Change Research Strategy for Primary Industries (CCRSPI) on the challenges of communicating climate change science.

Ted is the hub's director and also leads the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team that underpins the research integration and delivery to stakeholders.

The Communication and Knowledge Brokering team includes Suzie Gaynor (Communications Manager), Louise Gilfedder, (Tasmanian Midlands  Knowledge Broker), Gill Anderson, (Australian Alps Knowledge Broker), Ross Rowe (Departmental Knowledge Broker) and Vanessa Mann  (Business Manager). Adam Cowell is our dedicated liaison person in the Canberra based National Environmental Research Program team.

As the Business Manager for the hub, Vanessa is part of the Communication and Knowledge Brokering Team that underpins the research integration and delivery to stakeholders.

This page was last updated on July 18, 2013